Expert Judgment

Twitter Metrics & Measurement Tools

Posted in Uncategorized by dnzrn on June 12, 2009

 

“You can’t control what you can’t measure” 
-Tom DeMarco

You can’t control what you can’t measure 

-Tom DeMarco

 

These are some metrics that can be used to measure twitter activities. Measurement of social networking is not very mature right now. Some metrics are not adequate and some are totally useless. How they can be used in decision making and quality improvement is open to debade. There are not many academic literature on this subject. So it is a really good and fun research area. 

Some metrics are; 

TPI – Twitter Performance Index 

TCI – Twitter Character Indicator

This is a term that I made up. It is very underdeveloped right now, so your ideas will be appreciated. I’m not going in details right now but it basically categorizes twitters by using their number of followers, number of friends and updates (which are the basic measures of a twitter). Categories are like;

  • Observers: who have a small number of followers and updates but a very large number of friends,
  • Preachers: have large number of followers and updates,
  • Neighbors: have low and similar numbers of followers and friends (100 – 120),
  • Marketmen: have high and similar numbers of followers and friends (3000 – 15000),
  • Desperados: have high number of updates but low number of followers

 tpd – Tweets per day

TD – Tweet Density

R – Reach

Reach: number of followers + their followers (first order followers + second order followers) It is a measurement of potential audience.

V – Velocity

Velocity is the average of reach gained per day. The greater velocity, the faster the twitter attracts a network of people.

SC – Social Capital

Social Capital is the average second order followers of a twitter. The higher it gets, the more influence a twitter’s follower have.

Ct – Centralization

Centralization is about how much a twitter’s reach is dependent on it’s first order followers. Low centralization indicates a resilient network.

Grade – Calculated by various direct measurements. Can only be used in benchmarking.

Rank – Same as grade. Displays the rank of your grade. A benchmarking data.

 

These are the websites which provide some of those metrics: 

TweetStats: Gives statistics of your Twitter usage. Does not ask for password. Easy and simplistic interface. Provides tpd (tweet-per-day), Tweet Density, # Replies To, Interface Usage

TwitterFriends: Provides -in depth- statistics of your Twitter usage. Lots of metrics. Sadly most of them are not correct. Claims that it provides so called -visualization-. Half of the tools do not work. Server seems to be jammed most of the time. Does not ask for password. Really bad interface. Difficult to use and can be considered an aesthetics catastrophe. Nope… They need to work harder.

TwInfluence: Provides metrics regarding your followers. reach, velocity, social capital and centralization. (Isn’t it odd that twitter-supporting services have worse uptime than twitter itself? Come on, work harder !) Asks for your password.

TweetRush: Easy to use. Aesthetically enhanced design. However provides only your tweet count and average tweets per hour. (for the last week only)Does not require password.

TwitterGrader: A benchmarking tool. Provides grade metric, which is a composite metric. The details of the algorithm is not disclosed but here is a good explanation. It basically considers factors such as #followers, grade of followers, #updates, update recency, Follower/Following Ratio and Engagement. TwitterGrader calculates your grade and provides you with a comparison against the other people who has performed a grading using this tool. Currently there are 2,300,000 people in the database. Obviously it gets healthier each day as the tool is used by more people. High usability and enhanced aesthetics. Does not ask for a password.

TwitterRank: Another ranking tool. Ugly interface. Easy to use. Password is not necessary. But if you provide your password information it gives you a score at a better statistical confidence level.

TweepleTwak: Requires password. However could not even authenticate my password. Seriously what is wrong with these twitter-supporting sites? As TweepleTwak says “Private Alpha – it’s still a lil buggy.” So maybe another time TT. Aesthetically enhanced homepage though. I only wish it would have just worked.

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Your Social-Networking Interface in Your Job Applications

Posted in Uncategorized by dnzrn on June 12, 2009

 

Please go ahead and read these advices about setting up your online profile for your professional life:
 http://microsoftjobsblog.com/blog/preparing-your-online-profile/
Feel free to make comments on that one. 
I used to work as a project manager in a software company. I’ve had opportunities to get involved with a couple of hiring situations. 
I checked Facebook and Twitter accounts of potential employees to have an idea about their personalities. In my opinion, these sites can tell so much more than a typical psych/personality evaluation questionnaire. Like, how those people collect information, how they share it or not, what their attitude against their friends is. It really doesn’t matter if they love alcohol, or get involved in different types of -interesting activities-. 
A hiring process is a two-way negotiation. “Getting the job” should not be the only goal. I always question if I am fit for the job and work environment that I’m applying. If not, then there is no need for me to get the job. If I know that I am fit for it, then they can go ahead and check my Facebook. Do not forget, if you get the job, sooner or later your co-workers and employers will get to know you and learn if you love to ride a mechanical bull or not. What do you think?

A mirror reflects a man’s face, but what he is really like is shown by the kind of friends he chooses.

[Proverbs 27:19]

Please go ahead and read these advices about setting up your online profile for your professional life:

 http://microsoftjobsblog.com/blog/preparing-your-online-profile/

Feel free to make comments on that one. 

I used to work as a project manager in a software company. I’ve had opportunities to get involved with a couple of hiring situations. 

I checked Facebook and Twitter accounts of potential employees to have an idea about their personalities. In my opinion, these sites can tell so much more than a typical psych/personality evaluation questionnaire. Like, how those people collect information, how they share it or not, what their attitude against their friends is. It really doesn’t matter if they love alcohol, or get involved in different types of -interesting activities-. 

A hiring process is a two-way negotiation. “Getting the job” should not be the only goal. I always question if I am fit for the job and work environment that I’m applying. If not, then there is no need for me to get the job. If I know that I am fit for it, then they can go ahead and check my Facebook. Do not forget, if you get the job, sooner or later your co-workers and employers will get to know you and learn if you love to ride a mechanical bull or not. What do you think?